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Photo of The Ancient And Present State Of Glocestershire. The Second Edition. Illustrated with Seventy-Three Copper-Plates, Containing a Map of the County, a Plan and Prospect of the City, a View of the Cathedral, Sixty One Seats, and Three Hundred and Twenty Coats of Arms, of the Nobility and Gentry Residing in the County at the Time of first Publication. by ATKYNS, Robert.

ATKYNS, Robert.

The Ancient And Present State Of Glocestershire. The Second Edition. Illustrated with Seventy-Three Copper-Plates, Containing a Map of the County, a Plan and Prospect of the City, a View of the Cathedral, Sixty One Seats, and Three Hundred and Twenty Coats of Arms, of the Nobility and Gentry Residing in the County at the Time of first Publication.

London, T. Spilsbury for W. Herbert [et al],

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Folio (470 x 292 mm) Handsomely bound in contemporary russia, the boards decorated with a border comprised of gilt floral tools, a gilt floral tool at each corner, the spine divided into eight compartments with raised bands, green morocco and gilt lettering piece to the second, the remaining compartments exuberantly decorated with gilt floral tooling, gilt edges, gilt turn-ins, marbled endpapers; title-page with wood-engraved vignette, ([8], comprising preface, errata, author’s epitaph, directions to the binder, 8 engraved single page plates of armorial bearings (versos blank), 1 double-page engraved map of Gloucestershire, 452, [6]pp., 64 finely engraved double-page plates by Johannes Kip, including ‘A Plan of Glocester City’, a ‘West Prospect of ditto’, and ‘The Cathedral’, the remaining 61 plates depict the county’s principal houses, gardens and estates: these include Badminton, Barrington, Battsford, Berkeley Castle, Williamstrip, Dyrham, Henbury, Kings Weston, Saperton (the author’s own estate), and Chepstow Castle.

An exceptionally finely bound large paper copy, printed on thick stock. First published in 1712, the second edition is noted for the high quality of the paper and the printing. The frontispiece portrait of the author present in the first edition was omitted from the second.

Although intended as a county history, Atkyn's Glocestershire is primarily celebrated for its large and highly detailed engraved views by Johannes Kip of the county’s principal houses and estates. First published in 1712, the work is one of the finest British topographical works of the eighteenth century.

Upcott notes that ‘The greater part of the impression of this work was destroyed by a Fire, Jan. 30, 1712-13, in the house of Mr. Bowyer, Printer, in White Fryars; and some copies which were rescued from the flames still retain the indelible marks.’ Incredibly a similar fate destroyed a portion of the stock of the second edition some fifty odd years later. (William Upcott: A Bibliographical Account Of The Principal Works Relating To English Topography: London, Printed by Richard and Arthur Taylor, 1818). Remarkably all, or nearly all of the copper-plates survived the first fire and new impressions were printed from them for the second edition. Where there were gaps these were supplied with impressions taken from new copper-plates copied from the engravings in the first edition; for instance, the engravings of armorial bearings, despite these being out of date by 1768. The copper-plate for the author portrait, present in the first edition, was not replaced. Lowndes notes that following publication of the second edition, the copper-plates, along with those for Kip’s other great work, the Britannia Illustrata were apparently, ‘sold to a brazier in Cambridge as old copper, and destroyed.’ (Lowndes, iii, p. 1075).

BAL. Early Printed Books 147; Brunet I, 539; Upcott I, p. 250.

Stock number: 1268